… We few, we happy few, we band of brothers… St. Crispen’s Day Speech – William Shakespeare

 St. Crispen’s Day Speech – William Shakespeare

Henry V, 1599

Enter the KINGWESTMORELAND. O that we now had here
    But one ten thousand of those men in England
    That do no work to-day!

KING. What’s he that wishes so?
    My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin;
    If we are mark’d to die, we are enow
    To do our country loss; and if to live,
    The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
    God’s will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.
    By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
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Anti-Profanity

I do not swear because I am
A sweet and sober guy;
I cannot vent a single damn
However hard I try.
And in vituperative way,
Though I recall it well,
I never, never, never say
A naughty word like hell. Continue reading

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Comfort

Say! You’ve struck a heap of trouble —
    Bust in business, lost your wife;
No one cares a cent about you,
    You don’t care a cent for life;
Hard luck has of hope bereft you,
    Health is failing, wish you’d die —
Why, you’ve still the sunshine left you
    And the big, blue sky.

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Grin

If you’re up against a bruiser and you’re getting knocked about —

Grin.

If you’re feeling pretty groggy, and you’re licked beyond a doubt —

Grin.

Don’t let him see you’re funking, let him know with every clout,
Though your face is battered to a pulp, your blooming heart is stout;
Just stand upon your pins until the beggar knocks you out —

And grin. Continue reading

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The Call of The Wild

Have you gazed on naked grandeur where there’s nothing else to gaze on,
    Set pieces and drop-curtain scenes galore,
Big mountains heaved to heaven, which the blinding sunsets blazon,
    Black canyons where the rapids rip and roar?
Have you swept the visioned valley with the green stream streaking through it,
    Searched the Vastness for a something you have lost?
Have you strung your soul to silence? Then for God’s sake go and do it;
    Hear the challenge, learn the lesson, pay the cost.

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The Shooting of Dan McGrew

A bunch of the boys were whooping it up in the Malamute saloon;
The kid that handles the music-box was hitting a jag-time tune;
Back of the bar, in a solo game, sat Dangerous Dan McGrew,
And watching his luck was his light-o’-love, the lady that’s known as Lou.

When out of the night, which was fifty below, and into the din and the glare,
There stumbled a miner fresh from the creeks, dog-dirty, and loaded for bear.
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The Raven – Edgar Allan Poe

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
`’Tis some visitor,’ I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door –
Only this, and nothing more.’

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; – vainly I had sought to borrow
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The Battle of the Bulge

This year an ocean trip I took, and as I am a Scot
And like to get my money’s worth I never missed a meal.
In spite of Neptune’s nastiness I ate an awful lot,
Yet felt as fit as if we sailed upon an even keel.
But now that I am home again I’m stricken with disgust;
How many pounds of fat I’ve gained I’d rather not divulge:
Well, anyway I mean to take this tummy down or bust,
So here I’m suet-strafing in the

Battle of the Bulge.

No more will sausage, bacon, eggs provide my breakfast fare;
On lobster I will never lunch, with mounds of mayonnaise.
At tea I’ll Spartanly eschew the chocolate éclair;
Roast duckling and péche melba shall not consummate my days.
No more nocturnal ice-box raids, midnight spaghetti feeds;
On slabs of pâté de foie gras I vow I won’t indulge:
Let bran and cottage cheese suffice my gastronomic needs,
And lettuce be my ally in the

Battle of the Bulge.

To hell with you, ignoble paunch, abhorrent in my sight!
I gaze at your rotundity, and savage is my frown.
I’ll rub you and I’ll scrub you and I’ll drub you day and night,
But by the gods of symmetry I swear I’ll get you down.
Your smooth and smug convexity, by heck! I will subdue,
And when you tucker in again with joy will I refulge;
No longer of my toes will you obstruct my downward view . . .
With might and main I’ll fight to gain the

Battle of the Bulge.

Robert W. Service

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A word is dead

A word is dead
When it is said,
Some say.
I say it just
Begins to live
That day.
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The Sound of The Trees

The Sound of the Trees

I wonder about the trees.
Why do we wish to bear
Forever the noise of these
More than another noise
So close to our dwelling place?
We suffer them by the day
Till we lose all measure of pace,
And fixity in our joys,
And acquire a listening air.
They are that that talks of going
But never gets away;
And that talks no less for knowing,
As it grows wiser and older,
That now it means to stay.
My feet tug at the floor
And my head sways to my shoulder
Sometimes when I watch trees sway,
From the window or the door.
I shall set forth for somewhere,
I shall make the reckless choice
Some day when they are in voice
And tossing so as to scare
The white clouds over them on.
I shall have less to say,
But I shall be gone.

Robert Frost

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